WordPress Roulette

November 10, 2017 | By Comodo

WordPress, the world’s most popular CMS, requires web admins to perform a massive amount of time and effort to maintain currency and to be secure – and there are still risks – now there is a free solution to reduce these risks and effort.

A large proportion of all the websites being used today are using the WordPress content management system (cms). WordPress is free and for many users and companies it is quite simply incredible in its ability to provide complex, feature rich websites.

There is a very large marketplace of modules and templates that allow developers to modify their websites to deliver exactly what they need.

Thousands of web design companies vie for business and hundreds of thousands of business have also built their own sites themselves.

But as every web admin of a WordPress site knows, there are updates to each component created every few months. And if you have a website with a few modules you will be required to perform updates almost daily.

The challenge is that with every module update, you may have compatibility issues with other modules you are using. So, web admins find themselves is a difficult situation. Do I update a module and risk breaking something on my website, or do I not update a module and risk being hacked (as many module updates and primarily to patch identified security issues)?

It’s very easy to rack up dozens of modules on a WordPress site, each from different developers; making sure they all work well together is a complex task. But with each and every update, you need to re-test your environment. Some people run a duplicate site just to test all these interactions, while other chose to hold off on updates until they can confirm other user’s experiences, and others just accept every update as they are delivered. All choices require effort and an understanding of the risk you are taking.

The first time you update a module, and then find that part of your website isn’t working (normally because one if you customers calls and tells you) is the first time you fully understand the role of a WordPress website administrator.

This is the daily “pulling of the trigger” on the “WordPress roulette revolver”

Website administration is complex, time consuming and a balancing act of security vs functionality.

So, what if you could lower your security risk? What if you would change the dynamic, such that you are no longer relying on the patches of each module to maintain your security?

What if you had the equivalent of a large enterprise’s security operations center (SOC) overseeing the security of your website, ensuring you are protected from all malware, DDoS attacks, SQL injection attacks, robot attempts to login to your admin account by brute force retries?

Now you have a way of reducing all the modules needed to maintain security, and the pressure is off of you. You have a secure website.

And what if that service was available to initially evaluate your WordPress sites and remove malware and unwind any ongoing hacking attempts?

Quite simply this is available to every WordPress admin today FOR FREE.

Go to https://cwatch.comodo.com and sign-up now, and Comodo (a leading cyber-security company) will put its experts to work making sure your site is secure, for free. We believe that fixing a cyber-security problem should be free, and sites should only pay to prevent future infections. There is no upfront commitment required, you can choose to take the free service and never pay for on-going preventative services (but we believe you will be so pleased with the service and the reduction in work you will have to perform, you will want the preventative services). We’re so confident in our approach that we don’t even ask you for a credit card, this is a commitment free service.

Let Comodo help you today.

Comodo
Creating Trust Online

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